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World 06-Nov, 2023

Employee Well-Being Worldwide: Japan at the Bottom, Turkey on Top, and India Grappling with Burnout

By: Manya Upreti

Employee Well-Being Worldwide: Japan at the Bottom, Turkey on Top, and India Grappling with Burnout

Indian workers frequently experience high levels of job insecurity, long hours, and fierce competition. Image Source: IANS

Despite coming in second in the survey, India has its share of problems. The nation's swift economic expansion and growing need for a proficient labor force have resulted in intensely demanding work settings.

In a recent global survey on employee well-being, the results were nothing short of eye-opening. Although it's common to view the workplace as a place for both professional and personal development, stress and burnout can have a negative impact on workers. Japan ranked lowest on the spectrum for employee well-being, while Turkey topped the list, according to the report. Even though it came in second, India has a difficult time controlling the high rates of burnout among its labor force.

Struggle with Employee Well-Being

Japan has long grappled with challenges connected to employee well-being, while being known for its strong work ethic and dedication. According to the poll, there was little work-life balance, high levels of stress, and low job satisfaction among Japanese employees.

These problems have been exacerbated by the traditional Japanese work ethic, which frequently calls for long hours and steadfast dedication to the task. The idea of "karoshi"—death from overwork—is not unusual and reflects the significant difficulties faced by Japanese workers.

Unexpectedly, Turkey became the leader in terms of worker well-being. This accomplishment was made possible by the nation's dynamic culture, robust social networks, and increased emphasis on work-life balance. Turkish laborers expressed more overall well-being, reduced stress, and improved job satisfaction. Their success seems to be largely attributed to the culture that values family and free time.

China came in third with 75%, followed by India in second place with 76%. Indian participants assessed their overall health as follows: 81% for physical health, 79% for mental health, 78% for social and spiritual health, and 81% for mental health.

Despite coming in second in the survey, India has its share of problems. The nation's swift economic expansion and growing need for a proficient labor force have resulted in intensely demanding work settings. Indian workers frequently experience high levels of job insecurity, long hours, and fierce competition. Due to the confluence of these elements, there is a significant prevalence of burnout among employees, who report feeling stressed, worn out, and emotionally spent. The poll also revealed that one major problem in India is the absence of work-life balance. The report states that 59% of respondents from India reported having burnout symptoms at the highest rates. Chile (33%), Egypt (36%), and Saudi Arabia (36%), in that order, came next. Nine percent of respondents from Cameroon reported the lowest prevalence of burnout symptoms.

More than half of employees show symptoms of burnout, which triples their risk of leaving their positions. Twenty-two percent of workers in the 30 nations the survey examined report experiencing symptoms of burnout at work. There are several reasons for these nations' positions in the worldwide survey:

  • Work ethic and culture: Japan's traditional work culture emphasizes commitment to one's job above all else, frequently at the price of one's own personal well-being. On the other hand, the work-life balance that Turkey emphasizes encourages happier, more contented employees.

 

  • Economic Conditions: Due to India's quick economic expansion, there is a lot of competition, strong pressure, and a demanding work environment. Stress levels rise frequently because of the need for job security and career growth.

 

  • Social Support Systems: Turkey's robust social support systems, which include close-knit communities and families, are essential for fostering worker well-being. Japan, on the other hand, has a work-centric society that can isolate people and increase stress and dissatisfaction.

These results highlight how crucial it is to understand how social support networks, cultural norms, and financial circumstances affect workers' well-being. Improving work conditions and tackling these problems are essential for the general well-being of workers everywhere.

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